Learning

CVMA Fall Seminar Program & Speakers

This seminar is being held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Lake Tahoe. Veterinarians will receive 12 top-notch CE units and RVTs and CVMA CVAs will receive 8 CE units, a conference syllabus, a certificate of attendance, daily continental breakfast, and fond remembrances of a fun and productive weekend vacation.

 

 

 



Program

Friday, October 13th

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Registration & Continental Breakfast
Veterinarian Track
8:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Pancreatic and Small Intestinal Disease – Dr. David Williams

Saturday, October 14th

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Registration & Continental Breakfast
Veterinarian Track
8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Pancreatic and Small Intestinal Disease – Dr. David Williams
9:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Endocrinology – Dr. Audrey Cook
Technician Track
8:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Dentistry – Mary Berg, BS, RVT, LATG, VTS

Sunday, October 15th

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Registration & Continental Breakfast
Veterinarian Track
8:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Endocrinology – Dr. Audrey Cook
Technician Track
8:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. Dentistry – Mary Berg, BS, RVT, LATG, VTS


Speakers & Topics

David Williams, MA, VetMB, PhD, DACVIM-SAIM, DECVIM-CA

Dr. Williams founded the GI Lab in 1985 at the University of Florida, where he introduced the assay of serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) in the dog to the United States. His research has been focused on the development and application of new tests for gastrointestinal diseases, particularly those affecting the pancreas, small intestine, stomach, and liver of dogs and cats. He received his veterinary degree from the University of Cambridge and his Ph.D. from the University of Liverpool.

Sessions:

Friday, October 13, 2017, 8:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

The Pancreas – Historical Background and Introduction
In this lecture, the evolution of our current understanding of the pathophysiology of pancreatic disease, the tests used in diagnosis, and the rational behind treatment will be discussed.

Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI) – Diagnosis and Treatment
While the accurate diagnosis of EPI in cats (which is not as rare as you might think) and dogs is now very easy, simple treatment with oral pancreatic enzymes alone is often insufficient to see an optimal response, especially in cats. Other treatment measures that may be helpful will be reviewed.

Diagnosis of Chronic Small Intestinal Disease
Chronic small intestinal disease is a complex spectrum of often poorly-defined diseases. No one diagnostic approach is perfect, and clients cannot usually afford to do everything. How much do you need to know to come up with a rational approach to treatment?

Treatment of Chronic Small Intestinal Disease
Whether a diagnosis of small intestinal disease is definitive or presumptive, a logical approach to treatment can be formulated. Clients need to be educated that patience may be required to find the most effective management measures, and the lifelong monitoring and treatment will most likely be required.

Saturday, October 14, 8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Pancreatitis – Diagnosis and Treatment
There are now sensitive and specific methods to diagnose pancreatitis in dogs and cats, but not all available tests are reliable and it is important to know why some tests are better than others. Once diagnosed, the spectrum of clinical signs associated with pancreatitis varies from subclinical to fulminating and fatal. Fortunately, most cases are self-limiting given appropriate supportive treatment, and the prognosis is good.

Skinny Old Cats – An Update
Up to 40 percent of cats between 10 to 14 years of age have an often-insidious enteropathy that causes weight loss, often without other overt signs of gastrointestinal disease. Most such affected cats die within two years. How can you recognize these patients with idiopathic chronic enteropathy, and what can you do about it?


Audrey Cook, BVM&S, MRCVS, DACVIM-SAIM, ECVIM-CA & ABVP (Feline Practice)

Dr. Cook graduated from Edinburgh University and completed an internship at NC State and a residency in small animal internal medicine at UC Davis. She is a diplomate of the American and European Colleges of Veterinary Internal Medicine, and is a diplomate in feline practice with the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. She is currently an associate professor at Texas A&M with particular interests in endocrinology and gastroenterology. 

Sessions:

Saturday, October 14, 9:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Feline DM: How Cats Are Different
Feline diabetes mellitus can be a challenging disorder and many clinicians are uncomfortable treating these patients. The underlying pathophysiology of feline diabetes will be discussed, along with ways to facilitate remission. Attendees will gain a sound understanding of this disease and will be prepared to successfully educate owners and manage these cases.

Addison’s Disease: The Crisis and Beyond
This lecture will focus on the initial evaluation and management of dogs with classic hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s disease). These patients can require intensive care for the first 48 hours, but have an excellent long-term prognosis. Practical steps for addressing emergent issues will be outlined using case examples. The transition from the hospital to the home will also be discussed.

Atypical Addison’s: Spotting the Great Pretender
Many dogs with atypical (glucocorticoid-deficient) hypoadrenocorticism are misdiagnosed with gastrointestinal or hepatic disease. This lecture will review our current understanding of this overlooked condition, using case examples to highlight key concepts. Inexpensive screening options will be discussed, along with long-term management issues. Attendees will learn when to consider atypical Addison’s and how best to pursue the diagnosis.

Sunday, October 15, 8:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

DKA: The First 48 Hours
This lecture will focus on the initial evaluation and management of dogs and cat with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Although patients with DKA can be challenging, we will outline a logical stepwise approach to patient assessment and management. Attendees will leave with a usable plan for these cases and a sound understanding of how best to manage affected animals and optimize outcomes.

Trilostane: A Texan’s Perspective
Opinions regarding the best use of trilostane vary, along with questions about monitoring and dose adjustments. In this lecture, we will review the pharmacology of trilostane and current opinions about how best to use this drug in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism. Dr. Cook has used trilostane extensively since its release in Europe and will share her experiences with this drug.

Atypical Cushing’s: A Riddle Wrapped in a Conundrum
The term Atypical Cushing’s is used for dogs with clinical evidence of hyperadrenocorticism, but without evidence of hypercortisolemia. In this talk, we will review the evidence for this disorder and current methods to diagnose and manage this condition. Similar disorders such as Hair Cycle Arrest syndrome will also be discussed.


Mary Berg, BS, RVT, LATG, VTS (Dentistry)

Ms. Berg received her A.S. in laboratory animal science from Redlands Community College and her A.S. in veterinary technology from St. Petersburg College. She is the president of Beyond the Crown Veterinary Education and serves as the president of the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America, treasurer of the Academy of Veterinary Dental Technicians, and is a board member of the Kansas Veterinary Technician Association. She has authored or co-authored several publications and has spoken at state and national conferences.

Sessions:

Saturday, October 14, 8:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

A Review of Dental Anatomy and Charting
It is important to be able to identify oral pathology and anomalies and equally important to correctly record the pathology. A thorough dental examination includes both conscious and anesthetized examinations, charting disease processes, pathology and anomalies, and treatment plans. A chart is a diagrammatic representation of the dentition where information can be entered in a pictorial and/or notation format. It allows you to keep a record of the patient’s oral health, track changes in oral health, and record treatment.

Understanding Periodontal Disease
Periodontal disease is one of the most commonly diagnosed diseases in companion animals, but do we really understand this disease? Periodontal disease is also one of the most preventable disorders. Learn the mechanisms involved and the best prevention and treatment options available.

Oral Pathology (Most Commonly Observed Abnormalities) Part 1
It is important to be able to recognize and identify oral pathology and anomalies. The most commonly observed abnormalities will be discussed in this presentation. It is equally important to correctly record the pathology on dental charts. A thorough dental examination includes both conscious and anesthetized examinations as well as charting disease processes, pathology and anomalies, and treatment plans.

Oral Pathology (Most Unusual Abnormalities) Part 2
It is important to be able to recognize and identify oral pathology and anomalies. The more unusual abnormalities will be discussed in this presentation. It is equally important to correctly record the pathology on dental charts. A thorough dental examination includes both conscious and anesthetized examinations as well as charting disease processes, pathology and anomalies, and treatment plans.

Sunday, October 15, 8:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Dental Radiology Made Easy – Tips and Tricks for Great Rads!
Dental radiographs are an essential part of the oral exam. The crown is just the tip of the iceberg. Approximately 42 percent of dental pathology is found subgingivally. Radiographs will help diagnose pathology that is not visible from the surface, confirm suspect pathology, as well as help demonstrate the pathology to the client. Dental radiographs can improve the standard of care in your practice and increase its revenue.

Basic Dental X-Ray Interpretation
Dental x-rays are an essential part of the oral exam. You are now taking diagnostic x-rays but what are you seeing? Learn how to properly position dental x-rays to be able identify the correct teeth. Is that dental pathology or a normal structure? The basics of canine and feline dental x-rays will be presented along with a series of “What is that?” slides to help better understand dental radiology.

Feline Dentistry – Cats Don’t Read Textbooks!
It is often said that cats are not small dogs. It is equally important to realize that cats have not read the textbooks on dental problems. Feline dental problems can be very similar and yet very different from canine dental problems. Learn to identify oral pathology and anomalies commonly seen in cats.

Build a Thriving Dental Practice
Eighty percent of adult dogs and 70 percent of adult cats have some form of oral disease. Is your practice currently performing dental procedures on that percentage of your patients? Learn ways to explain and communicate the importance of good oral health to your clients and to take dentistry to the next level in your practice and fill those tables!

© 2017 California Veterinary Medical Association

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